A journey of self-actualization.

What Creates A Cultural Cycle?

We are not born blank slates. Before money or land, we inherit our parents’ blood. Within it are our raw talents, our potential. Then, they pass our languages onto us,…

We are not born blank slates.

Before money or land, we inherit our parents’ blood. Within it are our raw talents, our potential.

Then, they pass our languages onto us, as well as foundational wisdom.

But they also pass the traumas of our ancestors through opinions and genes.

These create many of our natural reactions and influence our pattern-recognition.

This bias is why the world reflects what is within us. Few rise to conquer their own shadows.

The structures of our brains provide us with preset assumptions and emotions. Our parents instill our foundational logic.

Our experimental play as children confirms or denies these presumptions. Then, our experiences challenge them as we grow.

As this occurs, the results form a filter through we which interpret reality.

These interpretations develop our expectations. Then, our expectations determine our actions and reactions.

The consequences of which forge our destinies.

When our fates play out according to said expectations, we call this the “truth” of our lives.

We gather what we have confirmed and then pass it down to our children.

Then, our children experience the same as we did. They reconfirm for themselves the “truth” that we gave to them.

And so begins the formation of a cultural cycle.

In and of itself, a cultural cycle is neither negative nor positive. But, the results that each cycle causes are.

The problem begins not with a parent’s will to pass on wisdom.

The problem begins with the fallacy in our childhood experiments. The confirmation of our beliefs before we decide whether to pass it onto our children.

The fallacy lies at the edge of the filter, through which we interpret reality. We all have limits to our perceptions.

Our experiences may confirm a hypothesis, a guess, an assumption. But our ability to experience, because of what the act of experiencing is, is always limited.

I could teach my children that their failures are due to poor planning and a lack of hard work. That, to succeed, they must embody personal responsibility. Self-reflection and good work ethic are the way, and the strain they feel is natural.

When they see this truth confirmed by my example, they assume it must be true. Their peers establish it themselves when they speak of their parents, who grew up in the same culture as I.

This confirmation strengthens their belief in the assumption. Then, when they finally test it in their own lives, they’ll reconfirm it yet again.

When this occurs, they play out their lives in alignment with their parent’s beliefs. This sets the course of their destiny.

A self-fulfilling prophecy in a cultural cycle.

On the other side of the coin, I could teach my children that their failures are due to their skin color. That the entire world is against them.

Not select individuals who so happen to be a part of the world.

I could teach them that their struggle is unnatural. That other people of different skin colors don’t experience struggle.

If they see me fail in life while blaming this unnaturalness, they’ll assume it to be true. Their peers, too, will confirm it when they speak of their parents.

This will strengthen their belief in the assumption.

And so, when they finally test it for themselves, their filter is preset. Their environment assured them that what they experience is unnatural.

As a result, they’ll play out their life this way, which sets the course of their destiny.

A self-fulfilling prophecy in a cultural cycle.

Who is correct?

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The Problem With Fighting For Redemption: Another New Edition In The Works

In a nutshell, the problem with my memoir, Fighting for Redemption, was that I wrote it while I was very young. Everyone has a story worth telling, some tidbit of…

In a nutshell, the problem with my memoir, Fighting for Redemption, was that I wrote it while I was very young.

Everyone has a story worth telling, some tidbit of wisdom that they can contribute to the world. But to deliver that wisdom in the best way requires reflection over a lifetime.

I’d bet I’m one of the only writers who has innovated his own story so many times. Throughout ten years and counting, I’ve published many editions and revisions of it.

More than I’ve kept count.

Each time, I don’t change the events of the story, or how they play out. I change the delivery of the moral, and the story’s general narrative tone. The drive of the narrative’s purpose.

This occurs because of the way that I take criticism into consideration. I’ve been on a journey of self-actualization. So there is always something more to improve about myself as I evolve as a person.

Thinking this way leads me to return to it, to check what I missed or could have done better. This is a process of self-reflection, because the events of the story are me.

I am the character in the story. To criticize the story is to criticize me in a way: either the man in the words, or the man writing the words.

I see a completely different writing at 30 than I saw at 24. And I’m likely to see a different story again at 50.

This is natural.

It’s an infinite process, because a writer can never perfect their work. There is always something more to tweak. Something that can be rewritten with a bit more mastery.

The positive note to take into consideration is the fact that I do see a different story as I grow. I see continual flaws, but this means that it is true that I am growing.

To see flaws now that I didn’t before means that my perspective has changed. This can only happen if I have grown.

And if I have grown, I have more to give. This calls for a revision.

Two Stories Told

There are actually two stories told with Fighting For Redemption.

One was of a man who existed; the other is of a man who is existing, evolving.

The man you’d meet in person is not the man you’d meet in the story. This is because the man you’d meet in person evolved from the man in the story.

One could write a story about how a man can evolve from having written his own story.

Because of this, I cannot say that I regret having written it. Even though I keep going back to revise it every two to three years.

If I hadn’t, I would have lived a very miserable life. This is because of how the act of self-reflection yields priceless fruit for decision-making. Without having written it, there would have been no self-reflection. Without self-reflection, I would have made very different life choices, ones that I doubt would have led me to the same freedom, happiness, and contentment that I’ve achieved now.

The Search For Meaning

I keep tweaking the story with a new, published revision, not because someone may leave me a bad review.

I keep tweaking it because I question the value I’m giving to others with my life.

What is the purpose to my life or the value to my existence? I don’t actually know.

The only thing that I know for certain about the purpose of my life is that I don’t actually know what that purpose is, or if it even exists.

Therein, how I could pretend to know some grand purpose or moral to my life story? How could I try to somehow force meaning into the events of the story, and in the process tell the audience what to think of them?

I can’t, and shouldn’t try to. It won’t have a forced moral. Its title may be Fighting for Redemption, but you determine what I did wrong or right that would require redemption, if at all.

It is like this blog. It has evolved. The first version of this blog was one way; four versions of it and years later, it is another.

There is no grand purpose to this version of “Norton’s Mind.”

It’s cleaner. Sleeker. With far less insecurity.

There are neither many colors nor needless widgets. Nor tons of content focused on convincing you that I am some kind of character, rather than me being my true character.

There is no fluff distracting you from the deeper meaning of what exists. No vocabulary that’s bigger than it needs to be, nor grammar more complex.

There is nothing stopping you from seeing me.

Of what is and what I have to say.

There is only a blank slate of snow and a wolf. The avatar of my heart and the state of simplicity I’ve achieved. The state of peace.

You choose to keep my words on your screen. In your mind.

That is my existence to you.

What meaning or purpose there is at all to attach to my existence is your decision.

I give myself to you.

Expect the upcoming rendition of the memoir to reflect the same.

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I’ve Launched NortonsMind 4.0

The New Theme I’ve been blogging for years, most of my words on Facebook. Each version of the blog seemed to represent the stages of my mind’s evolution. The previous…

The New Theme

I’ve been blogging for years, most of my words on Facebook.

Each version of the blog seemed to represent the stages of my mind’s evolution.

The previous one reeked of insecurity. I cared too much about what other people thought of me. I had a ridiculous FAQ section addressing toxicity from reddit. As if low-lives who lacked the courage to say nasty things to my face were worthy of a response.

Moreover, I stopped updating it because it was too high maintenance. The blog looked good on the surface. But there were too many steps involved with making a single, simple post.

I needed something minimalistic. Something energy-efficient.

Less is more.

But first, I had to detach from my public image, and this took growth of character.

Disengagement from Social Media

I have deactivated all public social media channels tied to my name (e.g. YouTube, Twitter, Quora, etc.).

This is with Facebook and LinkedIn as exceptions. They are useful for acquiring clients/work.

The reason why is because social media stresses me out.

I had begun gaining followers on YouTube, even without posting but once every few months. But I don’t like the fact that my heart skips a beat every time I get a notification that someone has subscribed.

When that occurs, I think: “Is this a person who’s going to add to my headache and anxiety? Or is this a person who may teach me something and understand, or at least show support?”

More often than not, it’s the former rather than the latter. That kind of stress has led me to self-sabotage over and over again.

Even though I know how to increase my audience and have proven that I can at will, I should stay off of social media.

I’m tired of wasting time arguing with people. I don’t even buy into my own public image of being some super smart dude.

Okay, it is fact that, according to some tests and challenges I’ve made it through in life, I’m smarter than average. And yeah, I speak a couple languages.

But even I don’t buy into my own hype.

At the same time, if I’m just honest about who I am to people, I often have to go through a ton of bullshit to prove that.

But for what?

Consolidation of Content

Another reason why I needed a minimalistic update was because of the companies I own now. I own multiple companies with different blog pages.

Meanwhile, experience and data has taught me that people connect with people first. Not brands.

So, as I develop my marketing and investment company, my technology company, and others, it’s just easier on my readers to just follow one website, instead of three.

…or four.

…or six.

Because I’m a serial entrepreneur. I’m going to just keep creating businesses and/or buying them as I find new projects that interest me.

One, simple, streamlined website to follow is what’s needed.

Let me know what you think in the comments below.

 

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